A retired navy man acted like a true shepherd and a real steward to his three gentle sea turtles whom he cared for two years by deciding to turn them over to the local government of Sto. Domingo, Albay to be returned to their habitat.

 

Andy Mádrìgáléjó

 

www.philexaminer.com

 

Freed three female green sea turtles Chelonia myda in the shoreline of Barangay San Vicente, Sto. Domingo, Albay. Photo by Andy Mádrìgáléjó.

Freed three female green sea turtles [Chelonia myda] in the shoreline of Barangay San Vicente, Sto. Domingo, Albay. Photo by Andy Mádrìgáléjó.

Sto Domingo, Albay, [04.03.18] – It’s freedom day for the three green sea turtles after two long years from the care of a retired navy man who fostered them in a  watery cage who handed them over to the Coastal Ranger, Bienvenido Barrios.

These three green sea turtles were freed back to their natural environment at 9:00 0’ clock this morning in the shoreline of Barangay San Vicente, Sto. Domingo, Albay led by Mayor Herbie Aguas and personnel from Albay Provincial Agriculture Office.

The retired navy man who handed over the three female green sea turtles.Photo by Andy Mádrìgáléjó.

The retired navy man who handed over the three female green sea turtles. Photo by Andy Mádrìgáléjó.

According to Bienvenido Barrios the three green sea turtles were handed over to him by Willy Revilla a retired navy man. Revilla has kept the green sea turtles as his pets and were tended for two years in Barangay Bariw, Bacacay, Albay.

After turning in to me his pets I informed the Mayor of Sto. Domingo about sea turtles which Mayor Herbie Aguas coordinated with the Provincial Agriculture Office for its immediate release.

The three green sea turtles were estimated to be more than 60 years old, according to Arsenio Onrubia of the Provincial Agriculture Office.

Mayor Aguas gave a profuse appreciation to the deed made by Willy Revilla for ceding the endangered sea turtles to the authorities to be release back into the sea.

In his acknowledgement to Revilla’s deed, he encouraged the public to help promote awareness in protecting the green sea turtles, particularly in Sto. Domingo.

Poached female green sea turtle from Rapu-Rapu, Albay Chelonia myda freed in the shoreline of Barangay Pandayan, Sto. Domingo, Albay last January 8, 2018. Photo by Andy Mádrìgáléjó.

Poached female green sea turtle [Chelonia myda]  from Rapu-Rapu, Albay was freed in the shoreline of Barangay Pandayan, Sto. Domingo, Albay last January 8, 2018. Photo by Andy Mádrìgáléjó.

In January 8 this year, a female green sea turtle was also freed in Sto Domingo upon the order of Mayor Aguas.

The sea turtle was poached by fishermen from Rapu-Rapu, Albay was brought to Tabaco City and was offered to a local lawyer in the city.

The lawyer refused to buy the green sea turtle and the poachers disappeared and it was turned over to Mayor Aguas.

Green Sea Turtle Information.

When born, green sea turtles are only 5 cm (2 in) long. But they grow up to 1.5 meters (5 feet) in length and can weigh over 300 kg (700 lbs), making them the largest of the hard shell sea turtles. The dorsal shell of the green turtle, or carapace, is wide, smooth, and brownish-olive in color.

The green sea turtle, with scientific name Chelonia mydas also known as the green turtle, black turtle or Pacific green turtle, is a large sea turtle of the family Cheloniidae. It is the only species in the genus Chelonia under class: Reptilia Order: Turtle Family: Cheloniidae with a conservation status as endangered.

According to worldwildlife.org.  Green turtles graze on seagrasses and algae, which maintains the seagrass beds and makes them more productive (much like mowing the lawn to keep it healthy).